DMT May Rapidly Improve Depression, Anxiety

According to a recent study[1] published in The American Journal Of Alcohol And Drug Abuse, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) may improve depression and anxiety when administered in a group setting.

In the Johns Hopkins University survey 80% of the participants found that the drug(medicine) improved anxiety and depression symptoms.
 
Studies show that a significant portion of those with IBD, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis suffer from depression and/or anxiety. [2]

I’d bet you a green smoothie that 100% of those with IBD have at some point suffered from depression and anxiety. I’d further bet you a mug of Bone Broth that 100% of humans have at some point experienced depression and anxiety.  It’s part of being human. 

If you’ve met me you’d likely be surprised that even I have my bad days. But I do! I’ve given up before. I’ve had suicidal thoughts. I’ve texted the “crisis text line” looking for help.

I’ve also experienced DMT.  Once at a friends medical clinic. and once in a private ceremony. Both times were profoundly positive experiences. Both times I asked a lot of questions, and found myself extremely nervous beforehand – not knowing what to expert even though I’ve spoken to many who have, have done heaps of research, and have witnessed other’s experiencing DMT.

Everyone’s experience is different and I recommend only considering this with the right guidance and in the right setting. 

DMT is a pretty hardcore psychedelic. It’s almost unbelievable that I would even consider taking a psychedelic as I grew up extremely against any illicit drugs, including marijuana though it was then legal in many states. 

To make a long story short. I was diagnosed with IBD, experienced the horrendous side effects of Prednisone, and decided there must be a better way.  In my research I found Roman Hanis and Marcus, who both healed themselves from Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis with outside the box alternative therapies.

I then learned of a government sponsored study by professor Dr. David Nutt that showed the damage of certain drugs.   

Then there was learning the history of marijuana prohibition and the healing of Justine Meader’s Crohn’s Disease through cannabis. 

Each of these moments, and thousands of other conversations opened up my mind to think about trying psychedelics for the first time. 

I asked a friend about his DMT experience, this was his reply:

I’ve had to hold people down who were trying to sprint through a glass patio door, another person who was slamming his legs into the ground so hard he would have broken his heel had we not stopped him, etc… and people under the influence are 100% no conscious of what they’re doing.

I’ve never experienced anything remotely like that before, and though I’m usually a pleasantly positive person, I do feel intense anger and injustice on the inside at times.   As we learned from Dr. Vincent Pedre whom I interviewed for The Crohn’s And Colitis Summit – Autoimmune Disease is often anger turner inward. 

I’m friends with one of the 5-MeO-DMT study authors, Joseph Peter Barsuglia. This is what he had to recently say:

My two cents (or 50 ; ) about our group scientific article on the sacred molecule, 5-MeO-DMT that made it into Medscape[3] and a few other sources last month…

The way the news surrounding this article spread is awesome. I do want to note that there was an omission of details about the context that is interesting and perhaps quite important. It appeared on the social media headlines that because the news came through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the study was conducted on individuals there, or conducted on a general survey of recreational users. Alan Davis was the fantastic primary author and is a research fellow at Hopkins, which is the reason for the affiliation.

However, what is essential is that the sample in this study were all initiates from a specific spiritual community who partook of this compound as a “sacrament”, only in group formats, and only in a ceremonial/ritualistic context.

The individuals who received the compound in this study were not explicitly seeking the medicine as a treatment for either depression or anxiety, although the majority reported improvements if they had a psychiatric history. This was not a treatment study or primarily an assessment of a clinical population. It was an observational study of “church” members of sorts.

These juicy tidbits did not make it into the news summaries in a clear way. An impressive percentage of individuals in this spiritual group who had prior diagnoses of depression and anxiety reported reductions in symptoms. However, for those who do know ; ) these phenomena are likely secondary byproducts of what is primarily a profound and rather reliable sacred/spiritual encounter.

I find this far more intriguing and perhaps relevant in some ways. The 5 can reduce depression and anxiety which is amazing, yet it is just barely scratching the surface of the infinite, as we are ; )

My sense is the capacity of this molecule to occasion spiritual awakening is what should be on the headlines, as I trust it will be in the near awakened future.

A little more detail on DMT: 

The medicine(drug) is extracted from the venom of The Colorado River Toad. The psychedelic experience typically lasts between 15 and 90 minutes depending on many factors including dosage, prior food and drink intake, and the type of DMT. 

I wanted to write this quick blog to document what I believe to be a promising treatment for those seeking assistance with depression and anxiety.

This is a documentary I’ve been wanting to watch. It’s an investigation into the long-obscured mystery of dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a molecule found in nearly every living organism and considered the most potent psychedelic on Earth. The documentary is based on the book[4] by Rick Strassman M.D.






References:
[1] The American Journal Of Alcohol And Drug Abuse – 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) used in a naturalistic group setting is associated with unintended improvements in depression and anxiety –  Alan K. Davis PhD, Sara So MS, Rafael Lancelotta MS, Joseph P. Barsuglia PhD & Roland R. Griffiths PhD – Epub 2019 Mar 1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30822141

[2] Canadian Journal Of Gastroenterology and Hepatology – Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease  – Glynis Byrne, Greg Rosenfeld, Yvette Leung,  Hong Qian,  Julia Raudzus,  Carlos Nunez,  and Brian Bressler. Published online 2017 Oct 18 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5664260/

[3] ‘Toad Venom’ Psychedelic May Rapidly Improve Depression, Anxiety: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/911056

[4] DMT: The Spirit Molecule: A Doctor’s Revolutionary Research into the Biology of Near-Death and Mystical Experiences by Dr. Rick Strassman

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